Conserving Long Islands Working Farms and Natural Lands
Community lands
(churches, cemetaries, school & fire districts, etc)
Land owned or protected
with assistance by the Trust
Other protected land

Definitions

Land Donation: An outright donation of land to the Trust or a municipality (herein after referred to as a "qualified organization") which permanently protects land from development, may provide the donor with a charitable income tax deduction, and a reduction in the value of ones taxable estate.

Conservation Easement: A donation of a conservation easement (defined as a voluntary agreement between a landowner and a qualified organization that protects land, or a portion thereof, from residential or commercial development in perpetuity) may provide the donor with a charitable income tax deduction, a reduction of property taxes on the protected property, and a special property tax credit (see New York State Conservation Tax Credit). The landowner continues to own the property, less its development rights, but retains the right to sell the restricted land or pass it on to heirs.

Sale of Development Rights (PDR): A sale of development rights (generally in the form of a conservation easement) to a qualified organization that protects land, or a portion thereof, from development in perpetuity. The landowner continues to own the property and retains the right to sell the restricted land or pass it on to heirs. The sale provides cash to the landowner and may result in a reduction of property taxes on the protected property. The proceeds of the sale, however, may be subject to capital gains taxes and remain as part of the landowner's taxable estate.

Transfer of Development Rights (TDR): In this transaction, development rights are transferred from one property to another property.

Bargain Sale: A sale of land or a conservation easement to a qualified organization at less than fair market value. The difference between the fair market value and the bargain sale price may provide the seller with a charitable income tax deduction.

Conservation Subdivision: The subdivision of land on a reduced-density basis that results in the protection of land of conservation value (i.e., agricultural, natural, or historical resources). When the amount of land protected exceeds that required under zoning regulations, the landowner may be able to sell or donate a conservation easement to a qualified organization and benefit from an expedited approval process. Given the reduced density, infrastructure costs of development may be reduced.

Charitable Remainder Trust (CRT): An arrangement in which property or money is donated to a charity, but the donor (called the grantor) continues to use the property and/or receive income from it while living. The beneficiaries receive the income and the charity receives the principal after a specified period of time. The grantor avoids any capital gains tax on the donated assets, and also gets an income tax deduction for the fair market value of the remainder interest that the trust earned. In addition, the asset is removed from the estate, reducing subsequent estate taxes.

Reserved Life Estate: A gift of a residence with a reserved life estate to a charitable organization allows the donor to continue living in the residence during their lifetime. Upon the donor's passing, the organization may sell the real estate and use the proceeds to carry out its charitable mission.

Family Limited Partnership/Limited Liability Corporation: Forms of ownership that can be used to transfer land and other assets from one generation to another. The value of land may be reduced by virtue of restrictions inherent in these forms of ownership, enabling it to be more easily transferred to beneficiaries over time, ultimately reducing estate taxes.

Like-kind Exchange: A tax-free transaction where property is exchanged for other qualified, like-kind property. An exchange can be accomplished using the proceeds from a sale of land or development rights as long as the exchange property is identified within 45 days of the initial sale and the proceeds thereof are reinvested in qualified business or investment property within 180 days of such sale. The capital gains tax on the initial sale is deferred.

Tax-exempt Installment Sale: In this option, because the proceeds of the sale are spread over a number of years, the seller defers payment of the capital gains tax and, by increasing the basis, reduces inheritance taxes that are paid during the term of the installment sale.

Agricultural District: Participation in the New York State Agricultural District Program may reduce real property taxes an average of 80% on land in agricultural production and provide legal protection from nuisance complaints. The landowner agrees to keep the land in agricultural production for an 8-year term.

Testamentary Gift: Gifts of land and conservation easements can be made to the Last Will and Testament. While testamentary gifts do not result in a charitable contribution for income tax purposes during the donor's lifetime, such gifts may dramatically reduce the estate tax liability faced by the next generation. Codicils to a will can be an effective interim measure to protect land while planning is underway.

Fair Market Purchase: If funds are available, the Trust may purchase land or conservation easements at fair market value. In other instances, the Tryst may negotiate a purchase on behalf of municipalities.

Successional Meadow: a stage of change between cultivated fields and woodland, consisting mostly of grasses and flowering plants which acts as habitat for many species. As succession progresses, woody plants (trees & shrubs) will become more dominant.

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA): a unique partnership between a farm operation and its members, where members pay a fee for a 'share' of the farm's crops.

Community Preservation Fund (CPF): The Peconic Bay Region Community Preservation Fund is a two percent land transfer tax approved through voter referendum in Suffolk County. The County collects the tax at real estate closings, and the funds are then redistributed to one of the five East End towns (Southampton, East Hampton, Shelter Island, Southold or Riverhead) based on the location of the property. The funds raised through this tax support land conservation.